Wednesday, March 7, 2018

How to Train a Dog Giving a Wanna Get Out

How to Train a Dog Giving a Wanna Get Out - If you're never really sure when your dog needs to get out, you might think that it would be great if the dog beckoned to you! This idea may seem like a lot of demanding on a dog, but it's really very easy to train pets to do it. Depending on your choice and your dog, you may choose to train it to ring the bell, give the straps to you, or bark.

How to Train a Dog Giving a Wanna Get Out
How to Train a Dog Giving a Wanna Get Out

Using the Bel Method


1. Hang a bell near the door.



Make sure the bell is within the reach of the dog and it sounds loud enough so you will hear it even if it is not in one room. It is also important that the bell should have enough endurance so that it will not be damaged by your dog.You can also use the wireless doorbell, provided your dog is able to push the button.If your dog looks scared by the sound of the bell, try to minimize his voice by closing it using a little adhesive tape. Next, let your dog get so used to the bell and gradually remove the tape. As soon as your dog is no longer bothered by the bell's voice, you can start doing the training.


2. Let your dog ring the bell.


Every time, before you take the dog out, gently lift your feet and help your dog ring the bell. Then let the dogs out immediately. Continue doing this training for several weeks until your dog learns to ring the bell himself.If your dog is really unmotivated with outer space, feed the dog while you take it out to help strengthen the training.If your dog is in the stage of practicing to go to the bathroom outside, be sure to reward him if he does.

3. Be sure to respond.


As soon as your dog is trained to ring the bell, be sure to respond when the dog does so by allowing it out. If you do not let him out when the dog rang the bell, the dog will be confused and may stop doing so.Continue rewarding your dog with food for successfully ringing the bell for several weeks, if not longer.

Train Your Dog Gives Her Strap


1. Let the dog straps lie in an affordable location.


If you want to train your dog to give the straps on you when the dog wants to get out, you will need to start putting it in any place that can be easily reached by it.The area near the door is an ideal location. Try to put it in a basket for easy reach.

2. Let your dog bite the strap. 


To begin this training, grab a strap and give it to your dog before letting it out, wait a few seconds while the dog bites it. Then give him a gift of food and let the dog come out. Repeat the exercise until your dog looks eager to bite the strap and bring it to you. [8]If your dog drops the string, take it and return it to his mouth and repeat until the dog has held it for a few seconds.

3. Walk away.


As soon as your dog becomes accustomed to biting the straps in his mouth when you are with him near the door, that's the right time to step up to a higher level of training. After you give him a strap to bite, start walking slowly away. Stand a few feet away from your dog and encourage the dog to come to you with a strap, reward with food if the dog does so. Repeat this exercise until your dog looks comfortable with the habit.When your dog is used to this condition, the dog may start following you by biting the strap without you calling.

4. Slowly add the distance.


As your training progresses, you should be able to walk farther from your dog until the dog will give you the straps on your own, without any help from you.This method may not be effective for dogs that do not like taking games (objects).When the dog lays the strap on you, be sure to respond by bringing the dog out. For the time being, continue using the gift of food to reinforce the habit.

Train Your Dog for Barking When Want To Quit

1. Before you can train your dog to bark as a gesture if you want to get out, you need to train it barking with the command "speak/bark." 


This trick is relatively easy to teach to your dog, but you may need to avoid if your dog has a lot of barking.To start the exercise, make your dog happy by waving his favorite toys around, making a scene, or doing other things that will make him bark.When your dog barks, give a piece of food as a gift. Try to give a gift for a one-time bark, because you do not have to push it to keep barking.As soon as you can make your dog bark consistently in this way, add hand gestures or verbal commands. Use the cues/commands consistently until the dog learns to bark when the cue/command is given.Continue to train and strengthen the habit by giving him a piece of food when your dog barks following orders.Do not reward dogs for barking unless specifically, you ask him to do so.

2. Let your dog bark at the door. 


As soon as your dog can bark as instructed, you can begin to train it to bark as a gesture to ask out. Start by going to the door and telling your dog to bark. When your dog barks, immediately release it out. As with any other training method, if going out is not enough as a gift for your dog, give the food as a gift while you let it out.

3. Be consistent. 


The more you are consistent with the exercise, the sooner your dog will learn. Let your dog bark every time you go out, and in no time, the dog will learn that he can ask out by repeating the habit.


Tips


All of the above practice methods work well for dogs that have been trained not to urinate inside the house. Train a dog to use the bathroom outside is a separate task from training it to let you know when the dog wants to go out.Regardless of what exercise method you use, it is important to know the motivations your dog has. For most dogs, the motivation is food, and for some other dogs, the use of different gifts like toys will work better. Some dogs love to go out so they may not need any extra prizes to learn this trick.


WARNING

As soon as your dog learns how to tell you that he wants to get out, the dog may abuse his abilities. Your dog will ring the bell, bark, or give you a strap every time he sees an animal to be disturbed, like a squirrel, outdoors.


Load disqus comments

0 comments